Carlton Street Heritage

The heritage designated Gold Cure Institute Building, 5969 College Street is in an area zoned R-3 with a 50-foot height limit. The developer wants to move the building closer to Carlton Street so its land is available for the construction of the towers.

The heritage designated Gold Cure Institute Building, 5969 College Street is in an area zoned R-3 with a 50-foot height limit. The developer wants to move the building closer to Carlton Street so its land is available for the construction of the towers.

Carlton Victorian Streetscape is valued as an excellent example of a Victorian era residential street. Originally Carlton Street was part of the South Commons in Halifax. Prior to 1818 this area was divided into four large lots that were purchased by merchants Richard Tremaine and John Staynor. The lots were again subdivided and houses began to be built in 1860 and continued until 1906. During this period construction materials and labour was inexpensive. Those who had money built lavish houses, such as those on Carlton Street, employing many workers.

Following the end of World War I the cost of building supplies increased and there was a shortage of labour, both of which slowed the construction of elaborate and large homes. In addition, Victorian homes, such as these on Carlton Street, became too costly to maintain and were often converted to rooming houses or hotels. Some were demolished and replaced by smaller, less adorned dwellings. Today Carlton Victorian Streetscape is a rare example of an intact Victorian era street, consisting of seventeen large and lavish homes.

Architecturally, Carlton Victorian Streetscape is valued for its sense of unity in scale, materials, and detail. These homes incorporate and blend elements of the Greek Revival, Modified Gothic, and Second Empire styles. The houses and townhouses range between two and three storeys, which allows for the human element and sense of community to flourish. All of the houses are of wood frame construction. There is a variety in the pitch and type of roof lines, placement of the doorways, and window styles that complement each other’s unique characteristics. In addition, the buildings offer a vast array of dormers, windows, and bays, decoration, porches, and verandas. Each house commands its own attention while complementing its abutting, opposite, or adjacent structure.

More detailed information Here.